Thinking about plastic surgery and living the skin you’re in

A very long time ago when Perez Hilton was still a thing, I recall coming across a story about my girl Tay and how it was obvious that she’d taken a break to get bolt-ons -his term, not mine. The entire thing, I’m not going to link to it, read like an exercise in body shaming and made me feel slightly queasy (just like reading any of Perez’s articles really)

usweekly

To put my finger on why it bothered me so, and that I’m still thinking about umpteen years later

A) The male gaze – yes, I know Perez is gay. It’s still gross. I don’t care.

B) The celebrity body as public property – There is a notion that because someone is a celebrity that everything about them physically is up for public consumption, to their armpit hair to stretch marks to any potential plastic surgery, and if it’s a body part that is particularly prominent, then somehow it’s a license for us to treat that body part as a national talking point.

I understand the argument that the celebrity is out there and thus they have put themselves in a position to be judged and seen. But frankly, when you comment on whether someone needs a nose job, needs to shave, needs to modify any part of themselves for your entertainment or aesthetic pleasure then you’ve crossed the line from pure speculation to something else, don’t you think?

C) The notion that it’s shameful (or at least scandalous) to make modifications to your body  This is my personal pet peeve, it’s 2017 people. Your body is your own and you only owe yourself justifications for the adjustments that you make to it. If Tay wants to tattoo a blue cat in the spot between her eyebrows, she can. If she wants to change her nose every month for the rest of her life, that’s her call. I can’t emphasise enough, that it’s her body and she can do whatever she wants with it.

Also once again, it’s 2017 and there is a plastic surgery procedure for pretty much any part of your external anatomy that you can think of. Get over it, it’s not scandalous anymore.

D) The very contradictory idea that public figures (and by extension ourselves) should be beautiful naturally but that actually being natural is not something we should be happy with  – I don’t recommend it, but try sifting through Daily Mail comments about celebrities who walk around in normal everyday life. Those tits are sagging, she has a double chin, she’s so average-looking! Gross, how can you leave the house looking like that? And then on the opposite spectrum, if whoever  went to go fix that errant chin – OMG, Celebrity B went and had a facelift! Do you know what I mean? We expect 24/7 pre-raphaelites from people who for the most part look like you and me. There’s a deep well of disappointment when they’re not.

In summary,

  • Men, please don’t comment on women’s bodies. Thanks.
  • Just because they’re a celebrity doesn’t entitle them to a lifetime’s worth of feedback about their crooked/errant body parts.
  • It’s your face, it’s your body, please do what you want with it. Be comfortable with who you are and if a new nose is what does it, then God speed.
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